If We Don’t Speak Up, Nothing Will Change By Lieselot

Lieselot

Lieselot

If We Don’t Speak Up, Nothing Will Change

I’d like to start this off by saying how honored I am that Alanna asked me to do a guest blog here. I suffer from a condition called Ehlers-Danlos, which is an invisible illness. And my way of speaking up for all of us, and helping all of us, is by writing. So, today, I’ll talk about how people see and treat those who have illnesses.

Firstly, I think it’s important to advocate for what you believe in, and to speak up and speak loud for those who cannot or are afraid to do so. If we don’t speak up, nothing will change, nothing will get better, because no one will listen. Take for example the gay rights movement; they spoke up and fought for years in order to get the same rights straight people do. They’ve dealt with bigots and haters. They’ve been abused, physically and mentally by those who don’t understand them, yet they never gave up, they kept on fighting for their right to be treated equal as others. And it’s the same with people who have illnesses, visible and invisible. We’ve also had to deal with haters and abuse, because we’re different or people don’t understand us. And if your illness is invisible, you have also had to deal with being called a liar or crazy. And those haters and abusers make it so people are afraid to speak up. They hide and tremble in fear of what’s to come next, and oftentimes, they’re alone.

One of the reasons I love social media networking; so much, is because it doesn’t just give us the opportunity to connect with others like us, but it also gives us the opportunity to let our voices be heard and raise awareness for our illnesses. I often try and use social media to raise awareness for invisible diseases, simply because oftentimes, we’re treated even worse than those with visible diseases, because people just don’t believe we actually have it.

We can also use social media to fight against those who seek to condemn us for something we have no control over, or those who make light of our situation. And sometimes, we win.

Recently, a photo was pictured online of a ‘sleeping beauty’, a girl with KLS. Someone took that photo, and posted ‘I’m jealous of her life’ on it. The idiocy of humanity never ceases to amaze me. People are jealous of a girl who sleeps for days or weeks on end, missing out on so much of her life? People actually think it’s acceptable to say those things? I don’t have KLS, but I do have periods where I do nothing but sleep, either because of my illness, or because I’m experiencing migraine attacks. It’s not fun. It’s not peaceful. It’s sad! And then when you wake up, you still might feel so tired that you want to go right back to sleep. Missing out on so many moments in life is nothing to be jealous about! People should feel lucky that they are healthy and can experience life to the fullest.

But, that’s the thing, isn’t it? People never feel lucky like that. People like to complain about anything and everything. Nothing is ever good enough. I’ve experienced moments when I was in my wheelchair, and people made comments such as ‘she’s lucky she doesn’t have to walk all the time’. People are annoyed that they have to walk a bit to get somewhere? Well, I’d rather be able to walk there, than have to use my wheelchair. I can’t go out or an entire day and walk on the beach or cruise the shopping malls. It’s physically impossible for me to do that. Yet, people would still say I’m the lucky one. I’m in pain all day, everyday, so much so that sometimes I can’t walk, not even with my crutches, but I’m the lucky one because I get to sit back and ‘relax’ while they have to walk.

Comments like those just show how little people understand of us. And how little they’re willing to understand. And the only way to make them understand, is to bombard them with posts on their social media, showing them how life really is for people like us. And sometimes, you just might be able to reach one person, and make them understand. And that’s why I do it. That’s why I fight for people like us, and why I write blogs, poems and stories about our living conditions. I hope that my messages will reach someone. Because, if you can make one person understand, you can make more understand as well.

I hope you found this interesting. And again, thanks to Alanna for letting me do this guest blog.

Much love,

Lieselot

To learn more about Lieselot and to read her incredible writings, connect with her here: Lieselot’s WebsiteLieselot’s FacebookBe sure to share this article with your family and friends! By sharing this article, you will contribute to help this powerful message get seen by more people!

7 Tips to help with sensitivity to light and noise

tips7 Tips to help with sensitivity to light and noise

There are many chronic conditions in this world. In a recent centers for disease control and prevention article, they stated that “As of 2012, about half of all adults—117 million people—have one or more chronic health conditions. One of four adults has two or more chronic health conditions.” You can read the full article here: http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/overview/ I know that my condition comes with sensitivity to noise and light. I’ve also heard of other chronic conditions experiencing symptoms of sensitivity to noise and light too. I want to share with you some tips that I have found to be helpful coping with these symptoms.

Watch TV and movies with subtitles if you are sensitive to noise. When I was ultra-sensitive to noise, my caregiver (my mom) would set the TV to where she would watch it with subtitles. That helped keep my brain quiet and she was still able to watch TV. It’s important to keep your mind calm and quiet when dealing with sensitivities to noise.

Identify your triggers. You may only be bothered by certain noises, so it’s important to know your triggers. Whether its programs with suspenseful music or big crowds of people, you will need to know what noises bother you so you can limit them. Do your best to limit and avoid the types of noises that are triggers.

When going outside, where sunglasses. If you are sensitive to the light, it is critical to protect your eyes by wearing sunglasses. I am giving away a free pair of black polarized Bamboo Hybrid Sunglasses. You can enter to win them here: Polarized Sunglass Giveaway – 2 Winners and here: Brand Name Sunglasses/Prescription Glasses Giveaway – 8 Winners! 

Keep your cell phone on vibrate. Instead of having a ringer, you can put your cell phone on vibrate. This will help limit the noise.

Draw the curtains. During the day, the sun can get very bright in some homes. If it gets bright and you are sensitive to light, it’s helpful to draw the curtains so that you do not have a sun glare.

Be honest. If your symptoms are acting up and you are with others, it’s best to be honest. Explaining your situation will most likely be of benefit to you because the people around you can be more sensitive and understanding. People may not understand you facial reactions to the stimulation around you. Just being in the sunlight can cause my eyes to tear.

Don’t have multiple things on at once. When you are home by yourself, or in the car, you have complete control over the noises, so be sure to limit them. Don’t have the TV and music on at the same time. Limit your noise. Focus on one thing at a time instead of having multiple noises and devices on. It will lead to a more peaceful and quiet environment.

I hope you enjoyed this post! Comment below with any other tips you have if you are sensitive to noise and light! And be sure to enter to win a pair of sunglasses here: Polarized Sunglass Giveaway – 2 Winners and here: Brand Name Sunglasses/Prescription Glasses Giveaway – 8 Winners! 

With Love,

Alanna Wong

5 Reasons Why You Should Track Your Progress When Living With Chronic Illness

Track Your Progress

Track Your Progress

5 Reasons Why You Should Track Your Progress When Living With Chronic Illness

It is so important to track your progress and milestones when living with a chronic illness. Whether you decide to track your treatment plan, health, fitness, emotional well-being, food intake, etc., tracking your progress will be beneficial to you and your health. Below I share with you 5 reasons why tracking your progress is so important! I also have a surprise for you in this article so be sure to read the whole article!

Tracking your progress will let you know if your plan is working for you. This will help you be able to tell over time if something is helping you in your health or making things worse. If your plan is not working, you will be able to make changes. You want to know if something is helping you or making you worse and the only way to know is to track it.

Tracking your progress shows you how far you have come since tracking your first goal. Seeing your progress and how far you have come since setting a goal gives you an instant boost of confidence!

Tracking your progress helps you stay focused on the positives instead of negatives. It is very common to forget your milestones if you do not keep track of them. Keeping a log of your progress will help you reach your milestones. Tracking your progress will show you what you have accomplished so far! Seeing what you have accomplished will make you feel good about your progress! Misfit is a great way to help you stay focused on your health and fitness goals. I am giving away a free Misfit tracker to help you keep track of your goals. You can enter the contest here: http://woobox.com/z67oms

Tracking your progress tells you what is helping you the most. When you track your progress you are able to know what is helping you most and what isn’t. You can then eliminate what isn’t helping and stick with what is helping you.

Tracking your progress keeps you motivated. Tracking your progress keeps you motivated to keep going! When you see your successes, it makes you want to work that much harder to attain your next milestone!

I hope you enjoyed this post! Please comment below to let me know you were here! If you would like a personal activity and sleep monitor that is stylish, enter here: http://woobox.com/z67oms

With Love,

Alanna Wong

 

 

Alanna Wong Featured On Invisible Disabilities Association Non-Profit Website

Invisible Disabilities Association

Invisible Disabilities Association

I am honored to be a part of the Invisible Disabilities Association (IDA) community! I connected recently with Wayne Connell, Founder of IDA and his wife Sherri. I am grateful that we have crossed paths! I love IDA’s mission: “The Invisible Disabilities Association (IDA) encourages, educates and connects people and organizations touched by illness, pain and disability around the globe. Formerly known as The Invisible Disabilities Advocate, IDA was founded in 1997 and incorporated in 2004 as a 501(c)(3) non-profit.” I am honored to be an Invisible Disabilities Association Guest Blogger for their website and to have joined the IDC Welcome Team! Through my journey, I have discovered that when you give, you receive. I am grateful for the blessings in my life and the inspiring individuals I am connected to! My most recent blog post on IDA’s website is about sharing your illness openly. You can read the article here: http://invisibledisabilities.org/invisible-no-more/sharing-illness-others-alanna-wong/

I hope you enjoyed this post! If you did enjoy it, please share it with your friends and leave a comment below! I love hearing from you!

All the best,

Alanna Wong

P.S. If you haven’t checked out The Invisible Disabilities Association (IDA)’s I encourage you to do so here: https://www.facebook.com/InvisibleDisabilities

Surviving Chronic Illness Through Acceptance

Acceptance

Alanna Wong writes about surviving trauma through acceptance.

Surviving Chronic Illness Through Acceptance

Today I am continuing my series on the seven qualities needed to survive chronic illness and overcome struggle. The first quality I wrote about is resilience, the second is strength, courage is the third, the fourth is love which brings us to the fifth quality, acceptance.

The fifth quality that a person needs when surviving chronic illness is acceptance from the people around them. Acceptance is extremely important when surviving chronic illness and overcoming a struggle. I never really knew the importance of acceptance until I personally experienced going through a traumatic experience. When you go through a tough time you begin to learn who accepts you and who doesn’t. Learn to appreciate and acknowledge the people who do not judge you in a negative way. Ask yourself, “Am I acknowledging and respecting that person’s kind treatment?” Or am I trying to find acceptance in people who are not able to give me the acceptance that I need.  Keep the ones who accept you close to you. If someone doesn’t accept you during your hardship, it may be time to move on.

So what does acceptance mean?  Acceptance is welcoming. It is letting go of your disappointments. It is seeing the positive. Acceptance is loving the person in the state that they are in and not trying to change or fix them. Acceptance is not blaming. It is not demanding. Acceptance is understanding. Acceptance is inclusion. Acceptance is love. Acceptance is what every person needs especially when going through a traumatic experience. Acceptance is checking in with the person that is struggling. Acceptance is sharing a moment in life together. Acceptance is being kind. Acceptance is having time. Acceptance is approval. Acceptance is sticking around.

I hope you enjoyed this post! If you did enjoy it, please share it with your friends and leave a comment below! I love hearing from you!

All the best,

Alanna Wong

p.s. If you haven’t read the introductory section of my book about my 13 year battle with Kleine-Levin Syndrome, you can read it here: http://alannawonglife.com/real-life-sleeping-beauty/ 

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